Two Photoshop CS5 Books
Book Review

On March 10, 2011, in Book Review, Photography, Tutorial, by Suzé Gilbert

The Adobe Photoshop CS5 Book for Digital Photographers
by Scott Kelby
ISBN:9780321703569
$54.99 US, $65.99 CA

 

The Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 3 Book for Digital Photographers
by Scott Kelby
ISBN:9780321700919
$49.99 US, $59.99 CA
Published by New Riders Voices That Matter


When I first began learning Adobe Photoshop many years ago, I was frustrated because most of the literature didn’t address the digital photographer. I spent hours learning and googling information on how to tweak black and white images so they could be close to what I could experience in the darkroom. I remember the first time I purchased one of Scott Kelby’s books, The Adobe Photoshop CS Book for Digital Photographers. Scott presented the tools within Adobe Photoshop in an articulate manner that a digital photographer was yearning for. Aside from his self-professed corny humor, Scott focused on how digital photographers could quickly fine- tune their images in Adobe Photoshop. He provided his readers with abundant information that enabled a swift fluency with the software. His newest offering, The Adobe Photoshop CS5 Book for Digital Photographers does not disappoint.

Continue reading »

Photoshop CS5 SCOOTS with 8 GB of RAM!

On January 20, 2011, in Review, by John Hamilton Farr


Photoshop CS5 Extended
Company: Adobe
Price: $999 upgrade $349 (education pricing also available)

I promised you an update to my earlier Photoshop CS5 review, and this is it! No, I don’t have a single bit of empirical evidence, but I do have 8 GB of RAM in my 3.06 GHz Core 2 Duo 24-inch iMac, hah!

With at least 8 gigabytes of memory, Photoshop CS5 runs 64-bit native on Mac OS X. What this means to you is that you just bolted a belt-driven supercharger to the top of that V-8: windows open and close with a snap, commands execute nearly instantaneously, and you’ll kick yourself for not upgrading the RAM earlier. But if you do upgrade, at least on the iMac, be aware of a treacherous gap in Apple’s (and everybody else’s) RAM installation instructions…

Continue reading »

Photoshop CS5 and Lightroom 3
Book Review

On December 20, 2010, in Book Review, by Ian Scott-Parker


Photoshop CS5 and Lightroom 3

by Stephen Laskevitch
Rocky Nook
Price: $39.95

The phrase “formal education” is used in some circles with a faintly superior air, whereas at the other end of the span of possible meanings it is sometimes used in a mildly disparaging manner. It is often useful to look at antonyms when checking meanings, and many of us will have experienced “informal education” in circumstances where little gets done and not much is achieved. Equally, many of us will have experienced those educators who have lost whatever excitement they ever had for their subject — educators whose presentations are at their best when mercifully they end.

Continue reading »

Adobe Photoshop CS5 Review: Two Big Things!

On November 15, 2010, in Review, by John Hamilton Farr

Photoshop CS5 Extended
Company: Adobe
Price: $999 upgrade $349 (education pricing also available)

Adobe Photoshop CS5 Extended first look

It's here! It's here!

I first read about Adobe Photoshop CS5 last spring before it was released, and two things jumped right out at me (well, maybe three). They’re both real and make a difference, so I’ll cut to the chase: if you use Photoshop on an Intel Mac with Snow Leopard and at least a Core 2 Duo processor, you probably want this latest version. I did and still do.

When the official review copy showed up on my doorstep in a plain brown wrapper six months ago, I was ready to rock and roll. Unfortunately, life intervened, so here we are. By now every reviewer on the planet has copied and pasted from PR materials, tested and retested, and had his or her fifteen minutes of fame. For heaven’s sake, Donny Yankellow has a fabulous full review right here at MyMac! (see “Related Posts,” below.) All things considered, the “first look” video I contracted for would be silly at this point, never mind that I’ve produced three of them already using screen-casting software from hell (the one with the 68-page manual). My official reviewer status has gone the way of peace, love, and understanding, and the knee-breakers will soon be hunting me down for the DVD. I’m guilty as sin, with a target on my back! What then can I do for you, our faithful MyMac readers, and the Mac community at large?

Tell you what I really think, that’s what. So here goes:

Continue reading »

Tagged with:  

Review: Adobe Photoshop CS5 Part 2

On September 7, 2010, in Features, by Donny Yankellow

Photoshop CS5 Extended
Company: Adobe
Price: $999 upgrade $349 (education pricing also available)

Last week you read (or should have read) part one of my Photoshop CS5 review. This week you get part two which includes more new features discussed and my conclusion. Is it worth the price of upgrading? Read on to find out!

Continue reading »

Nemo’s Ten Point Tutorial Number 12

Photoshop CS5 Workflow for Beginners — #2 — Color zinger in grayscale photo

Use and learn a new set of Photoshop CS5 tools and techniques in this lesson. Set aside an hour to complete it, and you’ll have time left over to tell your friends how easy and exciting it is.

Often an outdoor sunny day color subject has way too much contrast for you to attempt to get the lighting balanced. Don’t bother trying. Convert your photo to grayscale (black and white), because our eyes are much more forgiving of heavy contrast in grayscale pictures.

I blurred the face of this subject to protect his privacy. He was nice to agree to have his snapshot taken this morning as I passed his house.

Continue reading »

Nemo’s Ten Point Tutorial Number 11

Photoshop CS5 Workflow for Beginners — #1 — Off-color holiday food under glass

When taking a photograph indoors where light is artificial and inaccurate to the eye, don’t worry about in-camera color balance unless you know what you are doing. Available light photos are easier to improve via Photoshop CS5 than images made using a flash.

Below is my original JPG taken full frame with a steady hand inside a high end grocery store. I liked the bizarre irony of the subject matter and the linear chaos of the composition. I wanted to include the butcher’s hand reaching for some chicken apple spice sausages, but he wouldn’t cooperate, and I didn’t want to get thrown out of the store.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:  

Mac the Shutterbug

On May 16, 2010, in Opinion, by Scott Willsey

Digital photography has revolutionized the photography industry. I remember when, for most people, learning about photography primarily centered on learning the craft up to the point of removing the film from the camera and sending it in to get it processed. Sure, I dabbled in black and white film developing and photo printing in the early 80′s, but anything other than black and white print film was beyond my capacity to deal with myself. Now, thanks to digital cameras, computers, and specialized software, photographers have a whole other facet of photography to enjoy learning and mastering.

Using a Mac really makes the computing side of photography a treat. It’s no secret to Mac owners that OS X is far more conducive to getting things done as opposed to playing high priest to keep the computer running, as is often the case with Windows machines. That’s not fanboy hyperbole — I spent years primarily using Windows machines, and it really hit me not long after returning to the Mac that I was spending a lot less time maintaining the machine and much more time just using it.

One of the other reasons that Macs are a great choice for photographers is software choice. Like the new Photoshop CS5? It runs natively in 64-bit on the Mac. Like Adobe Lightroom? It’s there too. But while those programs are also available for Windows users, Mac owners have the option of using Apple’s superb Aperture photo editing and management software. Aperture 3 was released early this year and is a huge upgrade in terms of image editing flexibility and capabilities. For more casual photographers, iPhoto is great for basic editing, photo library management, and photo sharing, and it comes with every Mac.

If you like to put photos on flickr, there are also a ton of great third party applications for the Mac that make managing your photos and viewing photos from your contacts and groups easy. Two of my favorites are Flickery and Viewfinder.

There are also great photo sharing options for Mac owners. MobileMe provides photo album functionality that works well for basic photo sharing, and there are great applications like MemoryMiner that make organizing photos and creating and sharing meaningful photo slideshows on the web both fun and easy. Apple’s Aperture 3 also includes the ability to create beautiful slideshows.

Mainly, from a photographer’s standpoint, the focus should be on effectively managing and digitally processing photos. The Mac is good about getting out of the way and letting that happen.

Looking for something?

Use the form below to search the site:

Still not finding what you're looking for? Drop a comment on a post or contact us so we can take care of it!