Mac OS X 10.7 Lion: Peachpit Learning Series
Author: Robin Williams with John Tollett
Publisher: Peachpit Press
ISBN-13: 978-0-321-77701-0, 480 pages
Price: Paperback US$31.99, Book + eBook Bundle US$43.19, eBook Only US$25.59

Robin Williams, author of The Little Mac Book, Lion Edition has teamed up with husband and fellow author John Tollett to release the Mac OS X 10.7 Lion: Peachpit Learning Series book.

The book is delivered through 24 easy to follow lessons and is aimed towards new to medium level users. Experienced users will also find a good level of content and clarity on various topics.

Throughout the book readers will be presented with stunning visual examples to assist with understanding the Lion operating system.

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The Mac OS X 10.7 Lion PocketGuide
Review

On September 27, 2011, in Book Review, Mac OS X, Review, by Mark Greentree

The Mac OS X 10.7 Lion PocketGuide
Author: Jeff Carlson
Publisher: Peachpit Press
ISBN-13: 978-0-321-77661-7, 240 pages
Price: Paperback US$11.99, Book + eBook Bundle US$16.19, eBook only US$9.59

If you’re after a quick pocket guide book that offers more detail than other competing books, I suggest you pick up The Mac OS X 10.7 Lion PocketGuide book.

The author, Jeff Carlson, takes readers through Lion in a way that anyone at any level can adapt to. Within the easy to follow guides in each chapter, readers will find a treasure trove of addition hints and tips to help you perfect your user experience.

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Nemo Memo – Syncing’s not always a cinch

On October 20, 2010, in Apple, Features, iPhone, Macbook, Nemo Memo, by John Nemerovski


Guest report from occasional contributor Susan

A month or so ago, I noticed that my iPhone 3G was not updating when I made changes to either my Address Book or iCal on my one year old MacBook, so I made an appointment at my local Tucson Apple Store. Things have changed at the perpetually busy Genius Bar; iPhone techs now meet their clients at the front of the store, which is always very crowded with customers. These days, there are often more people in the Apple Store than in the rest of the stores combined in the upscale shopping plaza where Apple is located. Sad for those others, but I wish Apple would move into larger premises.

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Published in 2004, the oddly-titled ‘PowerBook Fan Book’ isn’t about the fans inside PowerBooks, or about the people who rave about PowerBooks in the way that others are keen on Manchester United. The ‘PowerBook Fan Book’ is actually an alternative to the user guide that came with Apple’s PowerBook series of computers, and tells the reader about these machines, what they need to work well, and how to get the most from them.

Of course, in some ways this is ancient history. Apple sold their last PowerBook in 2006, and since then the high-end of their portable Mac line has been filled with the MacBook Pro series of computers. But a review of the ‘PowerBook Fan Book’ isn’t completely pointless. Some of what’s included in this book holds as true for the MacBook Pro series as it did for the PowerBooks, but really, the value of this book nowadays is that it’s simply a neat collectable.

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iPhone data recovery service – DriveSavers

On February 12, 2008, in iPhone, by David Weeks

iPhone data recovery service
DriveSavers
http://www.drivesavers.com
800-440-1904

DriveSavers is possibly the best-known name in the personal computer data recovery business. The firm recently announced that it now provides data recovery for damaged Apple iPhones.

Being both a happy iPhone owner, and a curious Mymac.com reviewer, I wanted to learn more. Why would anyone need data recovery, when the iPhone syncs each time you dock it with your Mac?

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Why The Keynote Was Good News

On July 19, 2002, in Opinion, by Mark A Collins

The Macworld Keynote given by Steve Jobs disappointed many loyal Mac fans. Part of it was due to the fact that the rumor sites had spilled virtual *all* the beans. Part of it was sticker shock from the newly rebranded Mac service. And part of it was because it really wasn’t that exciting. But imagine you’re not a Macintosh user for a moment. Imagine that instead, you are an investor who either doesn’t own a Mac, or doesn’t even use a computer if you can help it. Imagine you have no feelings for Apple and their products outside of what it means as far as potential growth in the stock.

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