The future, what do you mean? How can we be in the future?

For decades many of us have been in awe of the possibility of the future. Not that long ago the thought of carrying a single panel computer capable of presenting music, film, books, and games was nothing more than science fiction.

I live by the belief that if man can envisage it, people can create it.

Of course, there is the possibility of going too far, as is famously shown in Planet Of The Apes, circa 1968.

For now we can sit back and relax with a small and hopefully harmless portion of technology that seemingly has the effect of enhancing our lives.

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About Mark Greentree

Mark Greentree is the principle blogger and podcast creator of His aim is to inform users at all levels of experience how to get the most out of the Apple hardware and associated software. He is also the lead host on Not Another Mac Podcast, an Apple based round table discussion with Mac users and experts from all over world.

Toast 9 Titanium – Review

On November 26, 2008, in Macintosh, Review, by Mark Sealey

Toast 9 Titanium
Company: Roxio

Price: Single license: $99.99
Upgrade from previous versions $79.99 after $20 mail-in rebate

Roxio’s Toast has long been the software of choice for reliable and flexible CD and DVD burning on Mac and PC. In recent years Roxio has slowly and steadily added features, generally made improvements to the working of the product and changed the interface of the software… it isn’t entirely Mac-like – not that it is in any way off-putting.

Now Toast 9 Titanium (releases 9.02, 9.03 and the current 9.04 were used to prepare this review) has added several new functions which keep pace with developments in optical media technology. By and large the product can still be recommended as the market leader in its field. There are other apps – not least Apple’s iDVD – which will allow sophisticated management and burning of CDs and DVDs. But Toast’s multiplicity of features sets it apart.

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About Mark Sealey

Mark Sealey is a British expatriate working and living in Southern California with his artist/writer wife, Roberta Lannes-Sealey, whom he met in 1996, when the web, she and he were much younger. Mark's interest in computers began in the the early ‘80s when his father suggested that, If we don’t understand how to control them, they’ll creep up behind us and make life unbearable. Have they? Using the venerable Acorn system until his move to the US, Mark wrote extensively about the BBC and RISC machines. He concentrated chiefly on education, music and productivity/system software; at the time Micronet and Prestel led the way for wide area networking… he published over 2,000 articles for these outlets. After graduating with a humanities degree, Mark was a teacher for 20 years until 1994 - first in Italy then the UK. Becaming increasingly attracted to the world of information technology as a major contributor to children’s learning and development, he eventually moved to editing the UK’s chief journals in the educational computing. He has always enjoyed freelance reviewing, consulting, editing and writing. When he moved to the US, he was fortunate enough to find full time employment at a major arts non-profit as a software engineer; though it’s doubtful if there’s a single skill which he was originally hired to use that’s still in daily use. Mark is also a composer of chamber and orchestral music, music critic, a published poet, photographer and environmentalist with an enthusiasm for fitness, vegan nutrition and long distance running. He is now convinced that only humans’ humility can save our planet.

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