MiCorder Digital MP3 Recorder
Review

On January 5, 2011, in Earphones, Features, Headphones, Review, Speakers, by John Nemerovski

MiCorder
Company: Olens Technology
$60 to $80 online


If you are an iPhone or iPod touch snob, stop reading now and get back to your favorite time-wasting toy. If you want to learn about a promising new audio recording device, keep reading.

MiCorder does only two things, and does them well. It records ambient sound, live music, and voice easily and efficiently with a built-in microphone in non-audiophile MP3 compression. And it records from any line audio source with an included cable, also as a 128mbps MP3. Stop yawning. The latter is MiCorder’s greatest asset.

Old cassette, reel, or 8-track tapes? Boxes of LPs? CD conversions? MiCorder’s LINE IN jack can receive any amplified audio signal and instantly make an MP3 of any length from it, because (drumroll) MiCorder has a built-in SD card slot. An unlimited amount of audio data can be recorded (applause).

Use the LINE OUT to send any MiCorder MP3 tracks to the playback speakers of your choice. Use the included USB charging/syncing cable to charge MiCorder’s built-in long life lithium ion rechargeable Polymer Lithium-ion battery (DC 400mAh / 3.7V) and transfer audio tracks to a computer.

The physical MiCorder is not professional quality, but it will hold up nicely for amateur or casual use. No case is provided, and the diminutive lightweight plastic shell easily shows scratches and nicks. Included earbuds are inferior, and Olens Technology plans to improve them and consider throwing in a sleeve.

The LCD screen is small, but manageable. No Apple interface designer was consulted, but you’ll soon learn how to navigate MiCorder’s display and menu options. Here is a helpful FAQ.

Olens Technology appears to be a small company that currently has two products. We plan to evaluate their projector and future releases.

MyMac’s questions during the review process resulted in immediate improvements in the documentation. This sort of  hands on approach is a good sign that this little company has a high opinion of its customers’ satisfaction.

Ron from Olens Technology tells MyMac:

MiCorder also plays back what it records. I only mention this because several people asked us this over the holidays before they purchased one. I thought that was an obvious given, but apparently not.

I just returned from Taiwan and China, and we have already incorporated some of the improvements suggested by you and the others. For example, the buttons have been upgraded and feel much better now, not so cheap feeling.

Thanks, Ron. We urge you to add a protective case, and either to include improved headphones or eliminate them completely.

MyMac Review Rating: 7 out of 10

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4 Responses to MiCorder Digital MP3 Recorder
Review

  1. Question from David Cohen:

    “One thing your review didn’t mention – what is the recording of live audio using the built-in microphone like? How does it compare to other devices (like the iPhone or an Ediirol)?”

    Answer from Nemo:

    In typical non-professional live audio situations, such as conversation or music, MiCorder has similar performance to an iPhone. Without advanced recording settings, when the original sound source is clear, MiCorder’s MP3 will be good. I continue to test MiCorder in different situations, and I am satisfied with its price-performance quality.

  2. Scott Willsey says:

    Looks pretty cool, John. Can’t really justify purchasing one as I have plenty of other ways to record things, but it would definitely fill a niche, IMO.

  3. RB says:

    I’ve looked at many sites reviewing this gadget and not one of them mentions that apparently you can’t separate tracks recorded from a phonograph record. It seems to me, unless there is a function somewhere I haven’t seen, that you would have to do totally separate recordings for each and every track on the record in order to get them separated in iTunes.
    I was hoping to get this confirmed or denied but no one mentions this important factor.

  4. “you can’t separate tracks recorded from a phonograph record”

    This is correct, RB, but there are many payware, shareware, and possibly freeware software solutions for track separation. Let me know if you are unable to locate one you like. Thanks for your astute comment.

    [Nemo]

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