Klix
Review

Klix
Company: Joesoft

Price: $29.95
http://www.joesoft.com/

Klix is a utility that recovers photos from digital cameras and memory cards. Klix can’t recover digital image files that have been partially or completely overwritten, but that caveat aside, Klix provides a quick and easy way to bring lost files back.

The basic Klix interface is very simple. When launched, the application scans for attached digital cameras or media cards. Klix can then be used to perform three different functions, the most important of which is to scan for deleted files. Both photographs and movies are located and then presented in an Image Recovery window. Photographs are given thumbnail previews, making it easy to identify the ones of interest. Movies do not have previews, though double clicking the generic QuickTime icon presented opens the movie in the QuickTime Player.


Browse recoverable photos in the Image Recovery window.

The recovery portion of the operation is very simple: select the files you’re interested in, click on the Recover button, and then choose where to save them to in the window that appears. There are a couple of questionable interface issues here. Firstly, there’s no “Save” button once you’ve chosen where to save the files to; oddly, you have to click the “Open” button to actually save the files. Secondly, there’s no progress bar, so when Klix is saving large files across slow connections (e.g., a movie file from a USB 1.1 device) it isn’t always obvious that anything is happening or how long its going to take. But these are minor quibbles compared to an application that fully delivers on its promise to make lost photo recovery easy.

Klix is more than just a one-trick pony, and has two other useful features. It can create disk images of media cards and digital cameras. The most obvious use for this feature is if you may want to recover files from a particular device in the future, but right now need to carry on using the device to take more pictures. Klix opens these disk images just as it would the original device. Klix can also be used to securely erase devices, with three levels of security available.


Klix will find all available devices, letting you recover deleted files, create a disk image backup, or erase the device securely.

Bottom line, Klix is compatible with most digital cameras and storage cards, but its worth trying out the demo version just to be sure. Assuming it works with your hardware, Klix is an inexpensive, useful little utility that makes recovering lost photos a breeze.

Pros: Easy to use, previews of deleted photos in recovery window, recovers movies as well as photos, compatible with a broad range of hardware, useful built-in utilities.

Cons: Movies lack previews, Save dialog box lacks a ‘Save’ button, well-priced.

Price: $29.95

System requirements: Mac OS X 10.2.4 or higher; Universal Binary.

MyMac.com Rating: 5 out of 5

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About Neale Monks

Neale Monks has used Macs since 1990, when he was won over by the simplicity of printing from a networked Mac compared to doing the same thing with networked PCs. Since that time he’s written for several Macintosh magazines including Macworld and Macformat as well as MyMac.com, InformIT, Peachpit, TidBITs, and the now-defunct AppleLust web site.

Besides using Macs to make his living every day of the week, he likes to tinker about with vintage Macs, and a few years back wrote an e-book called ‘Buying Used Macs’ published through MyMac.com.

Neale has a degree in zoology and a PhD in palaeontology. He lives in the market town of Berkhamsted on the edge of the Chiltern Hills.

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